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CYTOPOINT™ helps control the itch of atopic dermatitis in dogs

How does CYTOPOINT help reduce itch and allow damaged skin to heal?

CYTOPOINT is different from traditional drugs that treat itch. It is a biological therapy—a type of non-pharmaceutical treatment that works like your dog’s immune system. CYTOPOINT contains engineered antibodies very similar to natural dog antibodies. Antibodies are what an animal’s immune system uses to defend the body against infection or disease.1,2

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In this case, the antibodies in CYTOPOINT have been designed to specifically target and neutralize one of the main proteins that sends itch signals to your dog’s brain.5 This helps reduce scratching so the skin has a chance to heal.6

CYTOPOINT is an injection that your veterinarian gives your dog once every 4 to 8 weeks, as needed. In studies, after one injection, CYTOPOINT started controlling itch within 1 day, and kept itch controlled for a month or longer. CYTOPOINT also helped damaged skin begin to heal within 7 days.6

Is CYTOPOINT safe?

In a clinical study, dogs receiving CYTOPOINT injections had no more side effects than dogs who received placebo injections (injections with no treatment at all). CYTOPOINT is safe to use in dogs of any age, and can be used with many other commonly used medications and in dogs with other diseases.7

Because CYTOPOINT is a biological therapy and not a drug, it is naturally broken down and recycled by the body. It is not eliminated from the body via the liver or kidneys like most pharmaceutical drug products. This is one of the reasons CYTOPOINT can be a safe choice for your dog.

If you have additional questions about CYTOPOINT or your dog’s treatment, be sure to talk with your veterinarian.

Indication: CYTOPOINT aids in the reduction of clinical signs associated with atopic dermatitis in dogs.

References: 1. Gonzales AJ, Humphrey WR, Messamore JE, et al. Interleukin-31: its role in canine pruritus and naturally occurring canine atopic dermatitis. Vet Dermatol. 2013;24(1):48-53. doi:10.1111/j.136S-3164.2012.01098.x. 2. Olivry T, Bäumer W. Atopic itch in dogs: pharmacology and modeling. In: Cowan A, Yosipovitch G, eds. Pharmacology of Itch, Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology. 2015:357-369. doi:10.1007/978-3-662-44605-8_19. 3. Marsella R, Sousa CA, Gonzales AJ, et al. Current understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of canine atopic dermatitis. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2012;241(2):194-207. doi:10.2460/javma.241.2.194. 4. Olivry T, DeBoer DJ, Favrot C, et al. Treatment of canine atopic dermatitis: 2010 clinical practice guidelines from the International Task Force on Canine Atopic Dermatitis. Vet Dermatol.. 2010;21(3):233-248. doi:10.1111/j.1365-3164.2010.00889.x. 5. Olivry T, Bainbridge G. Clinician’s Brief. Advances in veterinary medicine: therapeutic monoclonal antibodies for companion animals. March 2015. http://www.cliniciansbrief.com/sites/default/files/attachments/ZoetisCN_Mar_FNL.pdf. Accessed June 21, 2016. 6. Data on file, Study Report No. C863R-US-12-018, Zoetis LLC. 7. Data on file, Study Report No. C961R-US-13-051, Zoetis LLC.

The product information provided in this site is intended only for residents of the United States. The products discussed herein may not have marketing authorization or may have different product labeling in different countries. The animal health information contained herein is provided for educational purposes only and is not intended to replace discussions with an animal healthcare professional. All decisions regarding the care of a veterinary patient must be made with an animal healthcare professional, considering the unique characteristics of the patient.

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